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20121201
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of trade, as well. yes, an ipad in china gets made and it's value point $50. but it's only about $20 of that that goes to china and the rest goes back to the u.s. we'll get into the dynamics of trade, as well, and how we measure it. we'll also be joined by the ilo director general, as well, guy rider. we'll hear from the head of the world intellectual property organization. so it's a big trade day here from geneva on "worldwide exchange." lots of great things to get into. and by the way, 157 members of the wto, shortly to be 158. kazakhstan today should get the approval, all 157 ambassadors are here. they will get approval later this afternoon. so an ever expanding membership base. >> kazakhstan being just the latest. plenty more from ross straight ahead on the program. in the meantime, we want to check in our how markets are doing. so much attention on italy. in particular, you can see the message broadly speaking this morning is in negative, we're seeing about a four to one outpacing decliners versus vapsers here. the stoxx 600 is down abo about .37%. let's take a look across the t
economies due to the european downturn and cooling ties with china. another negative factor is the drop in domestic car sales because state subsidies for buyers of fuel efficient cars expired in september. for the nonmanufacturing sector the sentiment index was down by four points from the previous surv survey. looking aahead the to the next three months, major manufacturers expect a slight improvement as they hope the u.s. and chinese economies recovery. they're concerned that cooling consumer sentiment will persist. japanese shoppers are spends less, and that's got retailers depress depressed. as tremendous to try get people to spend more some may fuel a price war. >> reporter: major supermarket chains have slashed t prices over the past three months on more than 350,000 products. >> translator: customers are become increasingly price conscious. we hope discounts on daily necessities will encourage them to visit more often and boost our sales. >> reporter: furniture manufacturers are opening a 10% to 40% discount on nearly 900 items. >> translator: consumer spending in the overall eco
.s. has slapped duties on wind turbine towers on china on price its says were unfairly cheap. this comes as washington welcomes a high-level chinese delegation led by the vice premier. his team is in the u.s. to talk trade and economy. he's expected to meet with u.s. treasury secretary tim geithner tomorrow. wang is the first official from the new leadership team to visit with the u.s. for more on the impact and implications of this, let's speak with frank ching, adjunct associate professor at the chinese university of hong kong. frank, hi. the first news that we're getting out of this appears to be more import duties s. this going to be the theme of u.s./china relations, or do you expect these meetings to be more of a thaw? >> well, i think that these are the first meetings since the new leadership in china was installed. and since president obama saw -- well, won second term. i think both sides want to make use of this occasion to improve their relationship. so this joint annual meeting is a platform, and i think that they will probably be able to achieve some progress on issues of con
.s. in general is looking positive. and the u.s. is creating a lot more jobs. china is still positive in the fourth quarter. china is going to show a slow and steady improvement. so we need those. >> higher expectations stronger in the likes of taiwan, india and brazil. let's go back to where you say they're weakest. greece, italy, spain, the netherlands. this is a very weak feature, indeed. how bad in it? >> it's bad. the eurozone is the global economic problem now. if you look at asia where i just returned from, both countries are feeling optimistic. but they seem to be inwardly focused now by being a triangle of china, india, indonesia. we're not seeing a great benefit into europe as we did before. for instance, germany is looking pretty pessimistic. based on its lack of export performance to places like china. >> yeah. when the bundes bank came out and shortly downgraded forecasts, how is the employment picture? if you've got a relatively healthy china and the u.s. consumer bounce back, wouldn't that help germany? >> it certainly would. germany is relatively flat in terms of the e
short-term debt, not long-term debt because of huge interest rate disc over time. if you look at china in particular, they are now looking at corporate bonds and alternative investments within u.s. treasury securities because they don't like what they see and understandably so. so we are living on borrowed time. we've created another bubble in my view is the reason the fed is doing a kissimmee and it was changed to where they have to be concerned with short-term employment. in the absence of the deck unsustainable over time. >> the most successful fiscal consolidations in the developed democratic world occurred in canada in the mid-1990s. i frankly asked canadian politicians, how did she do it? because the public wind from cheering on spending two and a set deficits within a matter of a year or two so that governments in canada now with some peril if they don't balance the budget. the answer you most frequently to do so they have to do was say that 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill and the canadian debt. the public immediately realized i was not a great idea and became
look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be concerned with unemployment. we need a fiscal deal. the fed has to change its policy because both are imprudent and unsustainable over time. >> right. >> one of the most successful physical consolidations in the developed, democratic world in canada, in the mid 1990's, and i ask the canadian politicians how did you do it? the public went from cheering on spending to deficits within a matter of a year or two. the government in canada now risks some peril if they do not balance their budget. the answer you most frequently get is all they had to do was say, 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill on the canadian debt, and the public immediately realized that was not a great idea. we cannot make that argument. we run these massive deficits and because inter
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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